Colorado canine house owners ought to take cautious steps to keep away from heat-related harm to their pets – CBS Denver

DENVER (CBS4) – If it’s too hot for you, your dog is too hot. Colorado’s Front Range will see triple-digit temperatures through Friday. When the sky is sunny, some pet owners go to the park, but the heat may turn some pups into patients.

“Think how you feel when you go outside. That’s how your dog feels multiplied by three, ”said Jonathan Gegerson, vet technician at MaxFund Animal Clinic.

Gegerson says it’s common for him to treat dogs with heat-related injuries in the summer. Denver’s heat wave has only just begun and he has already seen two dogs suffering from scorching heat.

“Her paws got so bad that they actually blistered and bled. She got a terrible paw infection. She was only outside on the concrete for 10 minutes, ”Gegerson said.

Cats and dogs have delicate paw pads and become vulnerable to temperatures that do not appear very hot to humans. According to the SPCA, the roadway can reach 147 degrees very quickly with an outside temperature of 88 degrees.

“We look for redness or flaking of the pad of the paw. That will cause severe irritation in that area, which can lead to real nerve damage, ”Gegerson said.

Artificial turf can get dangerously hot, even for pets, and cause blisters or burns.

The hot road surface can even increase a pet’s body temperature, which can lead to heat stroke. Even if your dog isn’t showing physical signs of pain, such as limping, red paws can be an indication that he’s been on hot asphalt for too long, according to Gegerson.

“If you see a burn, you should freeze your paws to relieve the inflammation. It will also help ease the pain because we are now pushing blood away. That way we won’t have any blistering, ”Gegerson said.

In the summer months, the sun doesn’t set in Denver until after 8 p.m.

The morning hours also reach high temperatures. Gegerson gets up at 4 a.m. to take his dogs for a walk to brave the heat.

“Time is always worth more than money to pets. I hope people take the time to care for their animals and are willing to make sacrifices for them, ”Gegerson said.

CBS4 spoke to fellow pet owners who choose to sacrifice for their animals at the other end of the clock.

“We get out later as the summer goes on,” said Alberto Martinez, a Denver dog owner. “We bring movement into harmony and stay cool.”

Further information on pet care in summer can be found at ddfl.org.

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